Wholesalers are asked to report key details on suspicious orders of controlled substances – The Script

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Wholesalers are asked to report key details on suspicious orders of controlled substances – The Script July 2018 p. 13 (a publication of the California State Board of Pharmacy)

“A wholesaler, upon discovery, shall notify the board in writing of any suspicious orders of controlled substances placed by a California-licensed pharmacy or wholesaler by providing the board a copy of the information that the wholesaler provides to the United States Drug Enforcement Administration.  Suspicious orders include, but are not limited to, orders of unusual size, orders deviating substantially from a normal pattern, and orders of unusual frequency.”

The Board requests, ” . . . that reports include explicit information as to why the wholesaler deemed the order suspicious. For example, indicate if (1) the order was of an unusual size, (2) the order deviated substantially from the normal pattern, or (3) the order was of an unusual frequency.”

Reference:   On Oct.
7, 2017, Governor Brown signed
into law Assembly Bill 401.
This bill added Business and
Professions Code section 4169.1


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Amazon in Talks with Xealth, Forays in to Medical Supplies – Nasdaq.com

Read the full article:  Amazon in Talks with Xealth, Forays into Medical Supplies – Nasdaq.com

“Amazon is striving to make the patient’s access to medical supplies easier and comfortable with the help of this project. Notably, this project will allow the doctors to prescribe medical products necessary for their patients after a surgery or in general cases through the hospital’s online portal.”

 


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OIG to CMS: Take stronger look at ‘place-of-service’ claims | HME News

“The report found:  For 72% of inappropriate claims, DME suppliers failed to correctly code the SNF as a facility. Instead, they coded the place of service as the beneficiary’s home, thus enabling the claims to bypass the edit that rejects separate payment for most DME provided at facilities. By definition, SNFs provide primarily skilled care and thus cannot be considered beneficiary homes.”

Read the full source article: OIG to CMS: Take stronger look at ‘place-of-service’ claims | HME News

Read the OIG report:  CMS Did Not Detect Some Inappropriate Claims for Durable Medical Equipment in Nursing Facilities


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